Faraimunashe Nkomo

Westfalen Wind (Zimbabwe)

Abstract – Presentation:

Zimbabwe is a landlocked country located in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Currently, electricity generation across SADC is still 90% fossil fuel based, and over 50% of the people have no access to electricity . Zimbabwe, like the rest of SADC, is in dire need of sustainable energy solutions that can contribute towards the reduction of energy costs for households & industries, expand access, increase reliability, lower emissions, and support socio-economic development . Given this background, renewable energy (RE) investments in Zimbabwe will, without doubt, ameliorate some of the current challenges inherent in Zimbabwe’s power generating sector. Similarly, the country’s national development goals such as economic transformation & growth can be realized on the back of private sector participation in financing, & deploying renewable energy technologies (RETs).
Zimbabwe has very good potential for solar photovoltaic (PV). This is buttressed by a nascent renewable energy regulatory framework, with an independent regulator, and a particular set of favourable policy incentives that attempt to offer transparency, longevity, & certainty for investors. Though both grid-connected, & the off-grid solar PV market have good potential for investment, it is the off-grid market that possesses the greatest potential and need for investment. The purpose of the paper is to
• To explore the role played by national support schemes for community power (i.e. customs duty exemptions for solar components, profit tax deductions, remuneration rates) in either enabling or constraining community power investors in striking the right balance between economic, technical, social and ethical considerations;
• To explore to what extent viable community solar PV projects can be realised through partnerships between (foreign) private sector investors (particularly those who specialise in the provision of up-front investment for REs), and community organisations (i.e. educational institutions) ;
• Finally, the paper will provide case studies of how community organisations, particularly educational institutions have benefited from investments in RE systems of varying technologies.
Zimbabwe is a landlocked country located in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Currently, electricity generation across SADC is still 90% fossil fuel based, and over 50% of the people have no access to electricity . Zimbabwe, like the rest of SADC, is in dire need of sustainable energy solutions that can contribute towards the reduction of energy costs for households & industries, expand access, increase reliability, lower emissions, and support socio-economic development . Given this background, renewable energy (RE) investments in Zimbabwe will, without doubt, ameliorate some of the current challenges inherent in Zimbabwe’s power generating sector. Similarly, the country’s national development goals such as economic transformation & growth can be realized on the back of private sector participation in financing, & deploying renewable energy technologies (RETs).
Zimbabwe has very good potential for solar photovoltaic (PV). This is buttressed by a nascent renewable energy regulatory framework, with an independent regulator, and a particular set of favourable policy incentives that attempt to offer transparency, longevity, & certainty for investors. Though both grid-connected, & the off-grid solar PV market have good potential for investment, it is the off-grid market that possesses the greatest potential and need for investment. The purpose of the paper is to
• To explore the role played by national support schemes for community power (i.e. customs duty exemptions for solar components, profit tax deductions, remuneration rates) in either enabling or constraining community power investors in striking the right balance between economic, technical, social and ethical considerations;
• To explore to what extent viable community solar PV projects can be realised through partnerships between (foreign) private sector investors (particularly those who specialise in the provision of up-front investment for REs), and community organisations (i.e. educational institutions) ;
• Finally, the paper will provide case studies of how community organisations, particularly educational institutions have benefited from investments in RE systems of varying technologies.

My Sessions